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Periodical article Periodical article ASC Leiden catalogue ASC Leiden catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Ecological Knowledge and the Regional Economy: Environmental Management in the Asesewa District of Ghana
Author:Amanor, Kojo
Year:1994
Periodical:Development and Change
Volume:25
Issue:1
Period:January
Pages:41-67
Language:English
Geographic term:Ghana
Subjects:farmers
agricultural policy
agricultural ecology
Economics and Trade
Development and Technology
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
Link:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7660.1994.tb00509.x
Abstract:This study examines ecological consciousness in farming communities in an old pioneer frontier zone in southeast Ghana, which has increasingly become marginal in the national economy. It is based on research carried out in the Manya Krobo District. The study questions the thesis that degradation is the result of the net actions of a large number of individual households in the contemporary period, that it results from a lack of environmental awareness, and that solutions lie in the promotion of new internationally defined environmental technologies. Independently of agricultural services, farmers have worked out responses to degradation which are remarkably similar to innovatory research being carried out in international and national formal research services. Yet these responses are ignored. This is partly a result of political and socioeconomic structures which determine that small-scale farmers should be marginalized. The study shows that within the Krobo area patterns of degradation are related to historical forms of pioneer frontier settlement and the incorporation of the regional economy of southeastern Ghana into the strictures of the colonial economy. Through a prioritization of different frontier areas according to their participation in cocoa production, present policy frameworks encourage further degradation in the forest. Bibliogr., notes, sum.