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Periodical issue Periodical issue ASC Leiden catalogue ASC Leiden catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Sahara: past, present and future
Editor:Keenan, JeremyISNI
Year:2005
Periodical:The Journal of North African Studies (ISSN 1362-9387)
Volume:10
Issue:3-4
Pages:247-647
Language:English
Geographic terms:French-speaking Africa
West Africa
Libya
Morocco
Western Sahara
Algeria
Sahara
Mauritania
Niger
Nigeria
Northern Nigeria
Subjects:2004
nationalism
Tuareg
refugees
Moroccans
national liberation struggles
foreign policy
military intervention
archaeology
prehistory
history
conference papers (form)
Link:http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/fnas20/10/3-4
Abstract:This special issue includes papers presented at a conference on 'The Sahara: past, present and future', held in June 2004 in the UK. The 19 contributions share a common perspective in that they see the Sahara as a bridge rather than as a divide across the African continent. They start in prehistoric times (Nick Brooks, Isabelle Chiapello, Savino di Lernia, Nick Drake, Michel Legrand, Cyril Moulin and Joseph Prospero on the climate, environment and society nexus) and come to the present day through the work, first, of historians (Ghislaine Lydon, Mukhtar Umza Bunza, Bruce S. Hall, E. Ann McDougall); then archaeologists (David Mattingly, Ruth Pelling, Nick Brooks, Savino di Lernia, William Challis, Alec Campbell, David Coulson, Jeremy Keenan); and finally 8 more diverse and more contemporary papers dealing with various aspects of the colonial and postcolonial State in the Sahara, in this case the examples of Mauritania (Zekeria Ould Ahmed Salem) and Niger (Klaas van Walraven); a new perspective on mobility strategies and networks amongst Tuareg in the Sahel (Alessandra Giuffrida); the struggle for Western Sahara (Laura E. Smith); and the question of nationalism, identity and citizenship amongst its Saharawi peoples (Pablo San Martin); authoritarianism, corruption and lack of democratization in the present Algerian Sahara (Dina Giurovich and Jeremy Keenan); Libya's foreign policy and involvement in contemporary Saharan and Sahelian affairs (George Joffé); and the implications of America's 'war on terror' for Saharan peoples (Jeremy Keenan). [ASC Leiden abstract]
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