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Book Book Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Gender and the judiciary in Africa: from obscurity to parity?
Editors:Bauer, GretchenISNI
Dawuni, Josephine
Year:2016
Issue:5
Pages:198
Language:English
Series:Routledge Research in Gender and Politics
City:New York; London
Publisher:Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
ISBN:9781138856493
Geographic terms:Africa
Egypt
Botswana
South Africa
Nigeria
Tunisia
Tanzania
Benin
Ghana
Rwanda
Subjects:judicial system
judges
courts
women
gender relations
constitutional law
women's rights
Abstract:In the last decades women ascended to the top of judiciaries across Africa, most notably as chief justices of supreme courts in common law countries like Ghana, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Gambia, Malawi, Lesotho and Zambia, but also as presidents of constitutional courts in civil law countries such as Benin, Burundi, Gabon, Niger and Senegal. At the same time, women are being appointed in record numbers as magistrates, judges and justices across the continent. This book addresses the issue of the increasing numbers and varied roles of women judges and justices. Contributors address the history of the judicial system, women's position in the current court structure, gender aspects of the selection processes for joining the bench, promotion of women's rights by women, and the challenges facing women judges and justices in Africa. Contents: Foreword (judge Mabel Agyemang); Gender and the judiciary in Africa: an introduction (Josephine Dawuni); Egypt: the lingering battle for female judgeship (Mahmoud Hamad); Botswana: delayed indigenization and feminization of the judiciary (Gretchen Bauer and Rachel Ellett); South Africa: a transformative constitution and a representative judiciary (Cathi Albertyn and Elsje Bonthuys); Nigeria: women judges enhancing the judiciary (Hauwa Ibrahim); Tunisia: a new constitution and more women judges (Salsabil Klibi); Tanzania: women judges as agents of judicial education (Mi Yung Yoon); Benin: women judges promoting women's rights (Alice Kang); Ghana: the paradox of judicial stagnation (Josephine Dawuni); Rwanda: balancing gender quotas and an independent judiciary (Jean-Marie Kamatali); Gender and the judiciary in Africa: conclusion (Gretchen Bauer). [ASC Leiden abstract]
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