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Periodical issue Periodical issue ASC Leiden catalogue ASC Leiden catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Special Issue: Citizenship (local & global): 20 years after the constitution
Editors:Gouws, AmandaISNI
Fourie, PieterISNI
Year:2016
Periodical:Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies (ISSN 1470-1014)
Volume:43
Issue:1
Pages:1-136
Language:English
City:Abingdon
Publisher:Routledge
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:constitutions
1996
citizenship
constitutional courts
women's rights
Link:http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cpsa20/43/1
Abstract:At the end of 2015, South Africa faced both a serious political and economic crisis that puts the South African Constitution and its values central in the struggles to overcome these crises; some reckon this puts South Africa squarely on the road to a failed state. The South African Constitution was widely hailed as one of the most progressive constitutions globally that was supposed to guide the 'new' South Africa in its post-apartheid institutionalisation of democracy. The great care that was exercised with its writing to include human rights in the Bill of Rights, to include clauses that would bolster diversity in a very diverse nation and to include oversight mechanisms to prevent the abuse of power is well documented. The process was also consultative of the population even though it includes a number of compromises as part of elite pacts made during the transition. The question is then: how did South Africa end up here on the eve of the 20th celebration of the Constitution with what may be a constitutional crisis? Contributions: Introduction to the special issue: Citizenship (local and global) - 20 years after the Constitution (Amanda Gouws, Pieter Fourie); What's trust got to do with it? Measuring levels of political trust in South Africa 20 years after democratic transition (Amanda Gouws, Collette Schulz-Herzenberg); The South African Constitution as memory and promise: an exploration of Its implications for sexual violence (Louise Du Toit); Reassessing the institutional legitimacy of the South African Constitutional Court: new evidence, revised theory (James L. Gibson); A constitution - almost of age? Public role-play in the construction of religious and related rights in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Lourens Du Plessis); Gender justice and the Millennium Development Goals: Canada and South Africa considered (Colleen O'Manique, Pieter Fourie); Active citizenship: a comparative study of selected young and established democracies (Cindy Steenekamp, Reinet Loubser); SAAPS statement on fees #FeesMustFall movement. [ASC Leiden abstract]

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