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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Gender and Class: Critical Notes on the Women in Nigeria
Authors:Abdullah-Olukoshi, HussainatuISNI
Olukoshi, AdebayoISNI
Year:1989
Periodical:African Notes: Bulletin of the Institute of African Studies, University of Ibadan
Volume:13
Issue:1-2
Pages:14-19
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:Marxism
class struggle
women
feminism
Cultural Roles
Status of Women
Abstract:This article examines the views of the Nigerian radical feminist and Marxist schools on the woman question in the country. It offers a broad critique of some of the positions which have been advanced by the radical feminists and Marxists in their discourse on gender and class in Nigeria and the status which should be ascribed to women's issues in the struggle for a democratic socialist order. According to the socialist-oriented radical feminists, most Nigerian women suffer a double oppression - as members of the subordinated social classes in a neocolonial capitalist setting, and as women. The radical feminists criticize Nigerian Marxists, who tend to subsume the gender question under class and place less emphasis on gender issues. The authors identify the main issues of contention between the two schools in Nigeria with respect to the question of gender and class, including the question of whether Marxism is really sex-blind as is stated by the radical feminists, the applicability of the concepts of exploitation and oppression to women's situation, and the primacy of either class or gender consciousness in women's struggle for liberation. The authors argue that since the primary contradiction in Nigeria is not between the genders but between social classes, class consciousness should form the defining framework for other forms of consciousness, but gender consciousness should not be collapsed within class consciousness. Notes, ref.
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