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Book chapter Book chapter Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Systems of agricultural production in western Sudan
Author:Haaland, G.ISNI
Book title:The Agriculture of the Sudan
Year:1991
Pages:230-251
Language:English
Geographic term:Sudan
Subjects:Arabs
Baggara
Fur
Nuba
pastoralists
small farms
agricultural mechanization
land use
agricultural land
Abstract:Western Sudan includes the two regions of Darfur and Kordofan. The area under mechanized farming has expanded dramatically over the last twenty years while there has been little progress towards solving the economic and ecological problems of the family farms. This chapter discusses a selected number of family farm management systems together with the factors which have produced changes in the farmers' allocation of time and resources and changes in the organization of the management units. Attention is paid to the Fur agricultural production system (socioeconomic framework of Fur farm management, economic strategies and spheres of exchange, livestock investment and nomadization); farm management systems in Kordofan (traditional Arab family farms, the Nuba farm management system); and the Baggara pastoral production system (overstocking and environmental degradation, pasture management, intensification and integration of agricultural and pastoral production). In conclusion, attention is paid to the effect of the wider economic and politico-administrative environments on family farm management, and the development implications of mechanized farming schemes. The fundamental dilemma in formulating an agricultural strategy for western Sudan concerns the balance between rapid mechanized development of relatively little exploited clay soils in order to secure Sudan's grain supply, and support for the family sector in order to reverse long-term ecological degradation and economic dualism. Bibliogr.
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