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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Minority Status of Islam in East Africa: A Historico-Sociological Perspective
Authors:Azevedo, Mario
Prater, Gwendolyn S.
Year:1991
Periodical:Journal of the Institute of Muslim Minority Affairs
Volume:12
Issue:2
Period:July
Pages:482-497
Language:English
Geographic terms:East Africa
Kenya
Tanzania
Mozambique
Subjects:Islamic history
Islamization
Islam
Religion and Witchcraft
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Ethnic and Race Relations
conversion
Link:https://doi.org/10.1080/02666959108716219
Abstract:This paper on Islam in East Africa, where Muslims are still a minority, focuses on its impact and status in Kenya, Mozambique, and Tanzania. Islam made few inroads in this part of Africa before the 1870s. What were then the factors that accelerated the unprecedented expansion of Islam in East Africa during the last part of the 19th century and more recently? Several theories have been advanced to explain this Islamic paradigm on the East coast, such as the adaptability and tolerance of African traditional religion, the flexibility of Islam, and the colonial equation. With respect to the latter, two theories are advanced. One claims that colonial penetration assisted the expansion of Islam through its pacification process ('pax colonica'), the other posits that the social and economic dislocation brought about by the oppressive colonial system forced many Africans to join the religion of their fellow Muslims ('odium colonicum'). This paper argues, however, that the 'pax colonica' and the 'odium colonicum' did not play a crucial role in Islamic expansion. Instead, it holds the view that the most significant factor for change was the activity of the newly introduced participatory Islamic brotherhoods, particularly the Qadirrya. Ref.
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