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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Participatory community development in Bophuthatswana
Author:FitzGerald, Mary
Year:1993
Periodical:The Community Development Journal: An International Journal for Community Workers
Volume:28
Issue:1
Pages:11-18
Language:English
Geographic terms:South Africa
Bophuthatswana
Subjects:community development
popular participation
water supply
External link:http://search.proquest.com/pao/docview/1304152246
Abstract:The project documented here was carried out in Ramogodi, a tribal village in Bophuthatswana which was given 'independence' by the South African government in 1977. Under the apartheid system it became the official homeland of the Tswana people. Permission to hold meetings and to engage in self-help activities has to be obtained from the chiefs and headmen in tribal areas and from the police elsewhere. This system of control effectively intimidates the people and serves to demoralize local grass roots community development workers. 'Betterment', a community development trust established in Johannesburg in 1983, has been involved in promoting adult education and community participation in self-help in Bophuthatswana since 1984. In August 1987, Betterment sent a community development trainee to do her fieldwork in Ramogodi at the invitation of the villagers. A needs survey showed that the need for a water supply system was the people's priority. This article looks at the nature of the water problem, the role of the civil engineer who was involved in the scheme, the nonformal education input, and problems encountered, including increasing malfunctioning of the two community development workers, mistrust and suspicion among the villagers, undemocratic succession within the committee charged with the task of looking at the water problem, nepotism, and dependency on white people. Bibliogr.
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