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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:A Failed Agenda? African Agriculture under Structural Adjustment, with Special Reference to Kenya and Ghana
Author:Gibbon, Peter
Year:1992
Periodical:The Journal of Peasant Studies
Volume:20
Issue:1
Period:October
Pages:50-96
Language:English
Geographic terms:Ghana
Kenya
Subjects:World Bank
economic policy
agricultural policy
agriculture
Development and Technology
Economics and Trade
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
international relations
External link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03066159208438501
Abstract:This paper contains a series of preliminary observations on African agriculture under structural adjustment. Most of the references to concrete developments are confined to Kenya and Ghana. The exposition is in four main sections. The first covers the content of the two principal World Bank manifestos on agricultural adjustment, the 1981 study 'Accelerated development in sub-Saharan Africa: an agenda for action', usually known as the Berg report, and the major World Bank report on sub-Saharan Africa of 1989. This is followed by a summary of the main economic criticisms of the World Bank's approach. Next come case studies of Kenya and Ghana, divided into a consideration of implementation of processes and outcomes. The material on implementation is partly based upon recent work by P. Mosley (1986, 1991) and J. Toye (1991). Finally, there is a brief discussion of the merits of Berg's critics in the light of the country studies, followed by an outline of an alternative explanation of why agricultural adjustment in Africa has been less than successful. The author argues that this is because the adjustment problematic assumes the presence of structures and conditions at variance to African realities. As a result, the main beneficiaries of adjustment tend to be the forces it ostensibly sets out to subvert. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.
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