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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Gender Bias in the Allocation of Resources within Households in Burkina Faso: A Disaggregated Outlay Equivalent Analysis
Authors:Haddad, LawrenceISNI
Reardon, ThomasISNI
Year:1993
Periodical:Journal of Development Studies
Volume:29
Issue:2
Period:January
Pages:260-276
Language:English
Geographic term:Burkina Faso
Subjects:children
social inequality
women
households
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Women's Issues
Cultural Roles
Marital Relations and Nuptiality
Family Life
External link:https://doi.org/10.1080/00220389308422273
Abstract:Discrimination in favour of boys in household resource allocation has been shown in a number of studies in South Asia; yet a lack of this discrimination has been shown in the few studies that have addressed this issue in sub-Saharan Africa. None of these studies have examined the issue differentiating rural and urban, agroecological zone, and income stratum, yet there is theoretical reason to believe intrahousehold resource allocation would differ by these stratifiers. This article addresses the issue using those stratifiers for data from Burkina Faso. 'Outlay equivalent' analysis is used. The outlay equivalent technique is based on the studies that have looked at the effects of household composition on household consumption patterns. The technique relies upon the identification of goods that are unrelated to children's characteristics. The rural data used to estimate the models come from the farm household survey in Burkina Faso conducted by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) in 1984/1985. The urban data come from the household survey conducted by the International Food Policy Research Institute and the Centre for Economic and Social Research, University of Ouagadougou in 1984/1985. Despite the stratification, the study supports the earlier findings of lack of discrimination in favour of boys. Bibliogr., notes, sum.
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