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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:'Die Bewustheid van Armoed': The ACVV (Afrikaans Christian Women Society) and the Construction of Afrikaner Identity, 1904-1928
Author:Du Toit, Marijke
Year:1992
Periodical:Social Dynamics
Volume:18
Issue:2
Period:December
Pages:1-25
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:nationalism
Afrikaners
women's organizations
Ethnic and Race Relations
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
History and Exploration
Women's Issues
Historical/Biographical
organizations
Education and Training
mass media
Religion and Witchcraft
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02533959208458531
Abstract:This article is a case study of the Afrikaanse Christelike Vroue Vereniging, from its inception in Cape Town in 1904, to the late 1920s. It examines the question of whether the grass-roots activities of this women's organization contributed significantly to the making of 'Afrikaner' subjects. The author argues that women were active participants in the construction of Afrikaner nationalism. The ACVV's leaders proclaimed the organization's support for Afrikaner nationalism, and identified poor 'Afrikaners' as recipients of their welfare efforts. However, middle-class women from Cape Town and the larger platteland towns, and poorer women from isolated rural areas joined the ACVV for different reasons. The extent to which ACVV members identified with Afrikaner nationalism also varied considerably. By the late 1920s, the ACVV executive's nationalist message had failed to reach significant numbers of its own members on the platteland. Nevertheless, the ACVV did play an important role in the construction of Afrikaner nationalism among rural members. Branches in the Cape's industrializing centres actively supported Afrikaner nationalism, and consistently applied ethnic criteria to their welfare work. Notes, ref., sum.
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