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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Social Work Practice in Botswana: Principles and Relevance
Author:Jacques, Gloria
Year:1993
Periodical:Journal of Social Development in Africa (ISSN 1012-1080)
Volume:8
Issue:1
Pages:31-49
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Botswana
Southern Africa
Subjects:social policy
social welfare
Labor and Employment
Health and Nutrition
sociology
social work
Employees
Supervisors
Abstract:This paper discusses the need for supervision in social work agencies and examines some of the functional components of supervision. The focus is on Botswana. The ultimate objective of social work supervision is to provide effective and efficient social work services to clients. This is a long-range goal which is facilitated by short-term objectives formulated in terms of the tripartite functioning of supervision, namely the administrative, educational, and supportive aspects of the process. The primary goal in administrative supervision is to ensure adherence to policies and procedures of the social work agency; the primary goal in educational supervision is to dispel ignorance and enhance skills among social workers; and the primary goal in supportive supervision is to improve morale and job satisfaction. Although supervision, in one form or another, is in place in the administrative structures of human service organizations in Botswana, the quality and dimensions of its practice fall short of the theory outlined in this paper. The main thrust in developing, improving, and refining supervisory practice to meet the needs of social work in Botswana lies in the adaptation of the theory to suit local conditions and the incorporation of such theoretical adjustment into supervisory practice. Effective supervision is hampered by a variety of constraints including heavy work loads and lack of facilities and qualified supervisors. Bibliogr., sum.
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