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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Colonial Hausa Idioms: Toward a West African Ethno-Ethnohistory
Author:Miles, William F.S.
Year:1993
Periodical:African Studies Review
Volume:36
Issue:2
Period:September
Pages:11-30
Language:English
Geographic terms:Niger
Nigeria
Great Britain
France
Subjects:images
Hausa
colonialism
History and Exploration
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/524731
Abstract:Ethno-ethnohistory refers to the recollections and interpretation concerning early Western visitors and settlers in the history of indigenous peoples. The author illustrates the ethno-ethnohistorical method for West Africa by using material that arose during fieldwork carried out among villagers in Hausaland (Nigeria and Niger) in 1983-1984 and 1986. Colonial-era ethno-ethnohistory reveals distinctive portraits of British vis--vis French administrators and policies. The latter are characterized by the expression 'mulkin zahi' ('a hot, burning rule'), whereas the British are regarded in much gentler terms. An examination of the perception of the 'White Man' as embodied in Hausa folklore also reveals the significance of clientship as a factor in the colonial relationship. Lessons gleaned from the investigation of Hausa ethno-ethnohistory may be applicable to the even more ambivalent relationship between social scientist and host community in contemporary Africa. Bibliogr., notes, ref.
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