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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The State and Islamization in 19th Century Africa: Buganda Absolutism Versus Asante Constitutionalism
Author:Owusu-Ansah, David
Year:1987
Periodical:Journal of the Institute of Muslim Minority Affairs
Volume:13
Issue:1
Period:January
Pages:132-143
Language:English
Geographic terms:Ghana
Uganda
Subjects:Islamization
Ashanti polity
Buganda polity
Politics and Government
History and Exploration
Religion and Witchcraft
colonialism
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Link:https://doi.org/10.1080/02666958708716022
Abstract:Why did Islam spread peacefully in certain African communities and why was it prevented from spreading in others? How strong were the political institutions that favoured or opposed Islamization in 19th-century African societies? These questions are raised to stress that the ability or inability of individual traders and chiefs to consider proselytizing was determined by the preoccupations of the social and political institutions under which they operated. Focusing on Buganda absolutism and Asante constitutionalism, the article argues that the rapid spread of Islam in Buganda can be attributed mainly to royal interventions and that in Asante, on the other hand, governmental actions blocked Islamization. Economic factors played an important role: unlike Asante, the Ganda administration had no control over the trade routes to the coast nor hegemony over territories settled by Muslim merchants. Trade with Arabs and conversion to Islam served two functions. It guaranteed the flow of commerce and enhanced the position of the Ganda king. Notes, ref.
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