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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Trading Centres and Development in Tanzania
Author:Mbonile, Milline J.
Year:1994
Periodical:Review of African Political Economy
Volume:21
Issue:59
Period:March
Pages:7-20
Language:English
Geographic term:Tanzania
Subjects:development
domestic trade
small towns
towns
Development and Technology
Economics and Trade
Urbanization and Migration
Labor and Employment
External link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03056249408704033
Abstract:As a contribution to the ongoing debate about how to counteract the centralizing tendencies of large urban centres, this paper looks at the role of small towns (trading centres) in the development of Makete District, in the southwest of Tanzania. More specifically, it examines three main research questions: What is the role of small towns in population redistribution and trade in the district? What is the relationship between these core areas and the periphery? What implications do they have for rural class formation and employment? A migration survey was carried out in Makete between July 1991 and April 1992. Interviews were held with 100 agricultural, 82 business and 78 wage employment heads of households. It is shown that significant intradistrict trade and labour migration takes place but in the more peripheral areas it remains limited. The lack of wholesale outlets is a particular handicap in all areas. Tension between administrative or political decisions regarding the location of various agencies and local business rivalries combine with regional ethnic differences to define the arena in which various contenders for class power are clashing, with the occasional arbitration of the more centralized agencies such as the Regional Development Associations, thus exemplifying the ultimate dominance of the centre, despite policies attempting the contrary. Bibliogr., sum.
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