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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Nonformal Education and Strategies of Intervention: A Case Study of Burkina Faso
Author:Maclure, Richard
Year:1994
Periodical:Africana Journal
Volume:16
Pages:269-291
Language:English
Geographic term:Burkina Faso
Subjects:social change
social structure
Mossi
nonformal education
Education and Oral Traditions
Development and Technology
Abstract:The funding and coordination of nonformal education (NFE) have accelerated throughout much of the Third World. However, the proliferation and institutionalization of nonformal training programmes have led to a more critical view of NFE as a tool for social change and development. One such critical perspective emerges from a recent case study based on fieldwork conducted in Namentenga Province in Burkina Faso in 1985-1987. The study focused on the 'animation rurale' programme of a North American-funded NGO (Plan de parrainage international, PPI) in two Mossi villages, Tenga and Delougou. The 'animation rurale' concept, which aims at combining basic technical training with the development of new social structures oriented towards democratic participation and collective self-reliance, informed the range of NFE programmes in areas of health, agriculture, literacy, and basic management, which PPI provided. The study examined the role of NFE as a key component of PPI's intervention and the shifts in the organization's intervention strategy in response to village-level structural constraints. The study concluded that, while providing much needed infrastructural services, PPI had also, despite attempts to alter its strategy of assistance, contributed to the geopolitical entrenchment of prevailing authority structures by concentrating its aid efforts in village centres. In addition, little would appear to have been done to reduce village dependency. Notes, ref.
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