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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The State and Maritime Nationalism in Cote d'Ivoire
Author:Iheduru, Okechukwu C.
Year:1994
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume:32
Issue:2
Period:June
Pages:215-245
Language:English
Geographic term:Ivory Coast - Côte d'Ivoire
Subjects:State
maritime transport
Architecture and the Arts
Development and Technology
Economics and Trade
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/161768
Abstract:One of the paradoxes of the Ivorian State is that while it has become famous for its 'open door' capitalism, it has consistently heightened its rhetoric of 'Ivorianization' through which it purports to indigenize the economy. An example of this dual approach is offered by the shipping sector, where the State became the vanguard of a vigorous drive for maritime nationalism, but at the same time pursued its 'open door' strategy which ensured continued domination of the sector by foreign capital. In order to explain this divergence between rhetoric and reality, the present article evaluates the 'organizational technology' of the Ivorian State under Houphouët-Boigny. It describes shipping in colonial Côte d'Ivoire, the activities of UNCTAD in the 1960s and the UN Convention on a Code of Conduct for Liner Conferences (1974), the structures of policy control established in Côte d'Ivoire, and the nature and activities of various 'conflict coalitions'. It shows that the government's shipping policies strongly encouraged the de-participation of Ivorians in the industry unless they were part of elite family corporations. State control of the sector became yet another source of the clientelism which aided the consolidation of Houphouët-Boigny's regime. Notes, ref.
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