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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Evolution of States, Markets and Civil Institutions in Rural Africa
Authors:Sahn, David E.ISNI
Sarris, AlexanderISNI
Year:1994
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume:32
Issue:2
Period:June
Pages:279-303
Language:English
Geographic terms:Guinea
Tanzania
Mozambique
Malawi
Subjects:political systems
State
political economy
Politics and Government
Development and Technology
Economics and Trade
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/161771
Abstract:This article examines the role of the State relative to civil institutions in four African countries - Guinea, Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. It addresses three phases in their political economies. The first concerns the emergence of the State from the struggle for independence, with high ideals and with great hopes and expectations. Nationalism was a characteristic feature of all four countries, as was the search for rapid economic transformation, and the faith in centralized decisionmaking and control over assets, production, and marketing. The second phase concerns the corruption and decline of 'dirigiste' governance. State intervention in the economy failed to achieve the declared objectives of most African leaders. The third phase concerns the process of State disengagement that has proceeded since the early 1980s with varying degrees of speed, commitment, and thus, success. The exposition is complemented with a brief discussion of the evolution of rural institutions in Africa in light of the new theory of institutional innovation, and of the interaction between the State and agricultural policies. Ref.
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