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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Africa Civilised, Africa Uncivilised: Local Culture, World System and South African Music
Author:Erlmann, Veit
Year:1994
Periodical:Journal of Southern African Studies
Volume:20
Issue:2
Pages:165-179
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:music
singing
Architecture and the Arts
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Ethnic and Race Relations
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/2637385
Abstract:In this paper the author offers a preliminary account of a century of South African music and its entanglement with the larger world. He contrasts two episodes, two historical moments which centre on two interrelated genres of Nguni a capella choral music from South Africa. The first episode involves the tours of the South African Choir to England and North America from 1891 to 1894. The second episode concerns the music of Ladysmith Black Mambazo in the 1980s, particularly its role in the Grammy Award winning album 'Graceland' by US pop star Paul Simon. Within the context of these examples, the author looks critically at the ideology and genesis of 'world music', of which South African music is only one, albeit a particularly evocative and instructive example. The author argues that the production of aesthetic difference is an intrinsic part of what in late capitalism is one vast, all-emcompassing environment of global culture. 'Difference' should no longer be seen as something inherent in the content of discrete cultures but rather something to be defined as an intrinsic feature of global music production. Note, ref., sum.
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