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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Elements of Techno-Economic Changes Among the Sendentarised BaGyeli Pygmies (South-West Cameroon)
Author:Daou, V. Joiris
Year:1994
Periodical:African Study Monographs
Volume:15
Issue:2
Period:October
Pages:83-95
Language:English
Geographic term:Cameroon
Subjects:Pygmies
sedentarization
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Link:http://jambo.africa.kyoto-u.ac.jp/kiroku/asm_normal/abstracts/pdf/ASM%20%20Vol.15%20No.2%201994/Daou%20V.%20JOIRIS.pdf
Abstract:From January to May 1985 the author conducted preliminary ethnographic research among the BaKola and BaGyeli Pygmies in southwest Cameroon. Although little is known about the BaGyeli, it can be assumed that in 1900 they were nomadic. Nowadays, however, they lead a semisedentary life, dividing their time between hunting, fishing, gathering and agriculture. The relationship between the BaGyeli and their non-Pygmy neighbours, the Ngumba, Mabea, Basa, Bulu, Mvae, Batanga and Yasa, has evolved from one of clientship within a system of traditional exchange - game, forest products and labour in return for iron, salt, soap, agricultural products and protection - to one of unequal exchanges marked by economic domination. The dependence of the BaGyeli on the villagers appears to be linked to their lack of self-sufficiency, since their plantations are still very often rudimentary and the harvest inadequate. The adoption of the villagers' sedentary way of life has modified the sexual division of labour among the BaGyeli, particularly in the construction of houses and in hunting. Technoeconomic changes have been greatest in the field of female activities. Most of the present-day work patterns of women (fish bailing, fish trapping, agriculture, food preparation) are modelled on those of the villagers, whereas those of the men continue the traditional patterns. These Pygmies, who are very mixed genetically, exemplify a society that has undergone marked acculturation and destructuration. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.
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