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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Administration of Pastoral Development: Lessons From Three Projects in Africa
Authors:Perrier, Gregory K.
Norton, Brien E.
Year:1996
Periodical:Public Administration and Development
Volume:16
Issue:1
Period:February
Pages:73-90
Language:English
Geographic terms:Somalia
Tanzania
Lesotho
Subjects:pastoralists
agricultural projects
animal husbandry
management
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
Development and Technology
Politics and Government
Link:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/(SICI)1099-162X(199602)16:1%3C73::AID-PAD856%3E3.0.CO;2-%23/pdf
Abstract:Administrative problems are a major cause of the poor performance of pastoral development projects in Africa. This study focuses on two aspects of project administration: policy development and organizational structure. Eleven actions in these two areas are tested against evidence from three pastoral development projects in Africa funded by USAID - the Tanzania Masai Livestock and Range Management Project (MLRM), the Somalia Central Rangelands Development Project (CDRP), and the Lesotho Land Conservation and Range Development project (LCRD). Site visits were made in 1989. Eight of the factors tested appear to have a strong influence on project performance. These can be grouped under three general headings: flexibility, simplicity and appropriateness. Project management can exercise flexibility directly in the way it defines its operational structure, modifies its strategy for development and carries out administrative procedures. The paramount feature of the modifications carried out before or during implementation of each of the projects was reduction in scope and simplification of design. Finally, desirable project performance is more likely to be achieved when the project's strategy is appropriate to the production system of the target population. Bibliogr.
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