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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Colour preferences and usages among the illiterate in Zimbabwe
Author:Mpofu, Stanley T.ISNI
Year:1995
Periodical:Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research (ISSN 1013-3445)
Volume:7
Issue:2
Period:July
Pages:209-241
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
Subjects:literacy
education
adult education
Teaching--Aids and devices
Colour
Abstract:In Zimbabwe, visual aids became an integral part of literacy materials in 1989. However, despite having been approved by grassroots literacy personnel, the current literacy illustrations have been the subject of many complaints. Both the Ministry of Education and Culture and the Adult Literacy Organization of Zimbabwe indicated in their 1990 annual reports that the illustrations for the literacy primer are difficult to interpret at the level of basic literacy. Some pictures were misinterpreted because of their ambiguity and difficulty for the target population, while others were misinterpreted because similar illustrations were used for both Shona and Ndebele primers. Colouring, it was suggested, would improve the texture of the pictures and eliminate perceptual difficulties in their interpretation. The present study was undertaken to examine the implications of colouring the pictures in the literacy primer. In particular, the study sought to determine colour preferences and usages among basic literacy learners. To this end 97 participants in literacy programmes were interviewed: 67 from Harare and 30 from Bulawayo. The study revealed that people generally like bright colours, which they associate with happiness, and generally dislike dull colours, which they associate with sadness. The study also showed that specific colour preferences and usages are not universal across cultures or communities. Bibliogr., sum.
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