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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Becoming a Writer of History; The Expressive Tradition and Academic Discourse at the University of the Western Cape
Authors:Leibowitz, Brenda
Witz, LeslieISNI
Year:1995
Periodical:South African Historical Journal
Issue:33
Period:November
Pages:101-118
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:history education
historiography
Bibliography/Research
History and Exploration
Education and Oral Traditions
External link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02582479508671849
Abstract:In academia the yardstick of progress is the written piece, and becoming an author is defined in relation to the essay, a formal piece of work that supposedly involves 'writing against' but which, at the same time, is written 'for' the 'professor' who judges its merit. A complementary activity which could enhance the apprenticeship of becoming an author and resolve some of this tension is the dialogic journal. Dialogic journal writing usually refers to students writing entries in letter or diary form to a lecturer, researcher or peer student. Between 1992 and 1995 the authors conducted three journal writing projects with history students at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa: in 1992 with two tutorial groups of full-time History I students; in 1993 with History I part-time students; and in 1995 in the History II course. This article analyses these three journal writing projects and concludes that the projects have demonstrated their potential to be used as valuable research, teaching and evaluative tools in the history class. Journal writing encourages reflexivity on the part of the students as well as the lecturer, and thus together with the research outcome, can have spin-offs beyond the confines of the actual project, feeding into both teaching and learning processes. Ref.
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