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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Post-Apartheid South Africa and Its Neighbours: A Maritime Transport Perspective
Author:Iheduru, Okechukwu C.
Year:1996
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume:34
Issue:1
Period:March
Pages:1-26
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:foreign policy
maritime transport
Politics and Government
Inter-African Relations
Development and Technology
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/161736
Abstract:This article argues that the time has come for a reevaluation of the euphoria that greeted the dismantling of apartheid, as well as the overly optimistic prognostications about South Africa's beneficial effects on its neighbours. Maritime changes since 1990 suggest that a 'demand-driven' neorealist foreign policy and diplomacy are emerging in South Africa. Some of the strategies which have facilitated South Africa's renewed dominance and control of the region's shipping trade, and which demonstrate the structural power of capital are discussed: control through consortia and maritime conferences; cooperation agreements, including space chartering; share acquisitions, joint ventures and takeovers; contract leasing; consultancy and maritime data banks; and rate cutting as a commercial strategy. Through the structural power wielded by market forces, a number of influential multinational enterprises have begun to play a leading role in determining the nature and direction of trade in southern Africa. This could hamper the efforts of both States and indigenous private sectors to foster long-term development, and has the potential to create conflict in the future. Notes, ref.
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