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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Gender and Class in the Early Classes and Fellowship Services
Author:Mafela, Lily
Year:1995
Periodical:Botswana Notes and Records (ISSN 0525-5090)
Volume:27
Pages:111-118
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Botswana
Southern Africa
Subjects:missions
social classes
women
History and Exploration
Religion and Witchcraft
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Ethnic and Race Relations
Education and Training
Historical/Biographical
Classes and Class Struggle
access to education
history
gender discrimination
Links:https://www.jstor.org/stable/40980042
http://search.proquest.com/pao/docview/1291906476
Abstract:Both class and gender were clearly crucial in determining people's participation in the missionary proselytization and education processes in Botswana. The royalty and nobility were the first to receive missionary education. Gender was an equally important variable, and class and gender interacted and crisscrossed each other in important ways. Increasingly, Christians were to become significant in terms of access to and participation in missionary education, enabling members of the lower classes to participate in Western education. In regard to the education of women, however, it was generally women from influential families who had the best access to education, which was confined mainly to domestic training. Note, ref., sum.
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