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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Education and the Growth of Religious Associations among Yoruba Muslims: The Ansar-Ud-Deen Society of Nigeria
Author:Reichmuth, Stefan
Year:1996
Periodical:Journal of Religion in Africa
Volume:26
Issue:4
Pages:365-405
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:Muslim brotherhoods
Yoruba
Islamic education
Education and Oral Traditions
Religion and Witchcraft
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
education
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/1581838
Abstract:One of the oldest, and certainly the largest of the educational associations of the Yoruba Muslims is the Ansar-Ud-Deen Society of Nigeria ('Jam'iyyat An.sr ad-Dn Naijriy), founded in Lagos in 1923. The major objective of the society covered the field of education, including the foundation and maintenance of educational institutions. The society's development, from a small group of educated young men in Lagos to a large national body with branches in most parts of the country, has deeply affected the position of Yoruba Muslims in Nigeria before and after independence. It serves to explain how the Yoruba Muslims tried to solve their educational dilemma of combining 'Western' and Islamic forms of learning, how they gained access to elite positions, and how they have handled their Yoruba and Islamic allegiances over different periods of time. Attention is paid to the origin of the Ansar-Ud-Deen Society; the structure of the society; religious activities and institutional consolidation; the role of Muslim women in Lagos; educational expansion and constitutional reform; the role of the Ansar-Ud-Deen in communal development; the Ansar-Ud-Deen and Muslim identity since the seventies; changing educational concerns (from 'Western' to 'Arabic'); and the Ansar-Ud-Deen in contemporary life. Bibliogr., notes, ref.
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