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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Strategies for Poverty Alleviation in Zimbabwe
Author:Chinake, Hazel
Year:1997
Periodical:Journal of Social Development in Africa (ISSN 1012-1080)
Volume:12
Issue:1
Pages:39-51
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
Subjects:poverty
Economics and Trade
Economics, Commerce
Development policy
social development
social work
Link:http://archive.lib.msu.edu/DMC/African%20Journals/pdfs/social%20development/vol12no1/jsda012001006.pdf
Abstract:Problems in implementing development policies in Zimbabwe can be attributed to many factors, including a flawed definition of poverty and development, lack of political will, inadequate resources, and lack of mass participation in the development process by poverty-stricken groups themselves. To work effectively with the poor, government, NGOs and other stakeholders need to have a thorough understanding of the causes of poverty, with special attention for the perceptions of the poor themselves. A historical and situational analysis of poverty in Zimbabwe suggests that the root causes lie largely in the disintegration of traditional African society following the inception of colonialism. The market-based reforms implemented under the Economic Structural Adjustment Programme (ESAP) have further marginalized the poor. The Social Dimensions of Adjustment Programme (1991) and the Poverty Alleviation Action Plan (1994) were attempts to cushion the negative effects of ESAP for the poor. Strategies for poverty alleviation should include an agrarian component focused on small farmers and women, land reform, increased investment and human capital formation, industrialization based on small-scale and labour-intensive producers, an expanded development of human capabilities, social welfare reform, and greater administrative decentralization and community participation. Social work has a crucial role to play in meeting the exigencies of the moment. Bibliogr., sum.
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