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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The World Bank and Peasant Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case Study of Agricultural Development Projects in South East Nigeria
Author:Badru, Pade
Year:1997
Periodical:Scandinavian Journal of Development Alternatives and Area Studies
Volume:16
Issue:2
Period:June
Pages:55-79
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:World Bank
agricultural projects
international relations
Economics and Trade
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
Development and Technology
Abstract:The seriousness of agrarian decline and the increasing shortages of food in the early 1970s led the Nigerian State to approach the World Bank for assistance in reviving rural production. In 1990 and 1993, the present author studied two World Bank agricultural development projects in River State in southeast Nigeria, the development of a large oil palm estate, on the one hand, and smallholding farms to be run by peasant farmers on the other. In this article, he discusses the economic and social impact of the projects on Ubima, where the nucleus estate is located, and Eleme, where the emphasis is on mini-estates, set against a third, control, village, Aluu, where there are no agricultural development projects. He concludes that while the projects succeeded in extending capitalist relations of production to the village, increasing the productivity of peasant producers in the process, the programme's most significant achievement was to reinforce peasants' dependence on the external global system of capitalist production, notably through the emphasis on export crop production, and the dependence on externally developed technology. The increasing alienation of female labour and separation of women from their means of production means that women are more likely to be worse off economically as a result of the introduction of these projects. Bibliogr.
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