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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Emerging Global Electronic Messaging and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Their Potential Development
Authors:Dzidonu, Clement
Rodriques, Tony
Okot-Uma, Rogers
Year:1998
Periodical:African Development Review
Volume:10
Issue:1
Period:June
Pages:189-210
Language:English
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:Internet
information technology
telecommunications
technology
Development and Technology
Education and Oral Traditions
External link:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8268.1998.tb00104.x/pdf
Abstract:The availability of advanced telecommunication and electronic messaging technologies is opening up the world to various types of communications applications. African countries, although not in the forefront of these developments, are beginning to put in place the necessary infrastructure to form the national backbones that will link them into the global information infrastructure. Some of the developmental opportunities that these emerging technologies offer the countries of Africa include information access and sharing, decentralization of government and business operations, global electronic trade and commerce, and electronic distance education. In the case of electronic distance education, there is no doubt that African institutions can benefit from the advances in educational and electronic messaging technologies and become active players in the development, provision and delivery of electronic distance education programmes for the African market and for export. Failure to take advantage of this 'technological window of opportunity' will not only deprive them of a share of what is estimated to become a multibillion dollar market, but it will also expose them to the risk of being reduced to consumers rather than developers or providers of these programmes. This will also pose a threat to the autonomy, relevance and survival of these institutions. Bibliogr., sum. in English and French.
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