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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:An African anthropology? Historical landmarks and trends
Author:Nkwi, Paul NchojiISNI
Year:1998
Periodical:African Anthropology (ISSN 1024-0969)
Volume:5
Issue:2
Period:September
Pages:192-217
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:anthropology
Anthropology and Archaeology
History and Exploration
Anthropology, Folklore, Culture
Applied anthropology
Pan African Association of Anthropologists
history
Abstract:Cultural anthropology, previously seen as an instrument of alien domination, should become the tool for intellectual and cultural liberation, enhancing Africa's consciousness of its cultural identity in a world that is increasingly becoming global. For African anthropologists, anthropology is not and cannot be a reflection of the outsider's view of Africa, but a means for Africans to study themselves in relationship to the rest of the world. The author draws out this theme by reviewing the paths and directions that anthropology has taken in Africa, particularly those of the last decade. He outlines the history of anthropology in Africa, particularly its university settings, and notes that by the end of the 1980s, anthropologists were quite able to address the prejudices and misconceptions surrounding the discipline. In addition, the space for public revival of anthropology had broadened as a result of policymakers and international agencies turning to qualitative research for means to address the social, cultural and economic aspects of development. The author further emphasizes the foundation of the Pan African Association of Anthropologists (PAAA) in 1989, its role in teaching and training, and its commitment to networking and international cooperation. Finally, he discusses the notion of an 'African anthropology', as distinct from an 'anthropology of Africa'. Bibliogr.
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