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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Economic adjustment and the deepening of environmental conflict in Africa
Author:Obi, CyrilISNI
Year:1997
Periodical:Lesotho Social Sciences Review (ISSN 1028-0790)
Volume:3
Issue:1
Period:June
Pages:13-29
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:economic policy
environment
Environment, Ecology
environmental degradation
Structural adjustment programmes
Economic conflicts
natural resources
Abstract:This article examines the interconnectedness between economic adjustment, its social ecology, and the deepening of environmental conflict in Africa, arguing that structural adjustment programmes (SAPs) have contributed to environmental degradation in most African States. Competition over access to and control of the environment, or resistance to intensified expropriation, immiserization and environmental degradation, lie at the heart of environmental conflict in Africa under adjustment. The article explicates modalities through which economic adjustment promotes the production of environmental degradation in Africa within the rubric of globalized capitalist relations, and the conflict between the social forces of extraction (and degradation), local and external, and those of local resistance. The case of the Ogoni of Nigeria's Niger Delta versus Shell exemplifies the dialectics of globalization and local resistance. The harsh social consequences of adjustment, and the growing alienation of the people, has also led to the intensification of local resource wars, such as those arising from increased deforestation, and the struggles over arable land and water in the Sahel region. Bibliogr., sum.
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