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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Gendering Poverty: A Review of Six World Bank African Poverty Assessments
Authors:Whitehead, Ann
Lockwood, Matthew
Year:1999
Periodical:Development and Change
Volume:30
Issue:3
Period:July
Pages:525-555
Language:English
Geographic terms:Ghana
Uganda
Tanzania
Zambia
Subjects:gender relations
poverty
Economics and Trade
Women's Issues
Development and Technology
economics
Link:https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-7660.00128
Abstract:The link between gender and poverty lies at the level of process and relations. For this link to be established, poverty must be analysed as relation and process, as must gender. With this in mind, the authors analyse the ways in which gender concerns actually appear, or do not appear, in Poverty Assessments carried out by the World Bank in Ghana (1992, 1995), Zambia (1994), Tanzania (1996), and Uganda (1993, 1995), and the institutional and organizational context in which these Assessments were produced. They find an enormous variation in the extent to which women and/or gender issues are present in the six Poverty Assessments under scrutiny, as well as a sharp contrast between the treatment of gender issues in the measurement of poverty, particularly in the use of participatory methodologies, and their absence in the policy sections of the documents. They conclude that in the absence of a clear analytical framework for understanding gender, the treatment of gender in the Assessments is driven, on the one hand, by a set of epistemological and methodological choices about measuring poverty, and on the other, by a set of prescriptions for reducing poverty which originate in the World Bank's 'World Development Report 1990'. On the whole, the Assessments betray a lack of any substantial appreciation of the issues raised by the study of gender and poverty in Africa over the last two decades. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.
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