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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Second Congo War: More Than a Remake
Author:Reyntjens, FilipISNI
Year:1999
Periodical:African affairs: the journal of the Royal African Society
Volume:98
Issue:391
Period:April
Pages:241-250
Language:English
Geographic term:Congo (Democratic Republic of)
Subjects:coups d'état
military intervention
Politics and Government
Ethnic and Race Relations
Military, Defense and Arms
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/723629
Abstract:This article analyses the change in regime in Congo-Zaïre in May 1997 and the dilemmas with which Kabila was faced as soon as he had taken power. It argues that the change of regime was the result of the combination of two factors: the weakness of the Forces armées zaïroises, and the operation of a formidable regional coalition in support of Kabila's rebellion. The main reason why Zaïre's neighbours intervened was related to their security and to the status of Congolese Tutsi in the East. Contrary to the expectation of Kabila's sponsors, the new regime proved unable or unwilling to solve these problems. By early 1998, the signs of a worsening relationship between the Kabila regime and its Rwandan and Ugandan sponsors became increasingly visible, and in July war had become inevitable. This new war, however, proved not to be a simple repeat of the 1996-97 rebellion. While the latter enjoyed unanimous support within and outside the country, the alliance was fragile, and this frailty showed in 1998, when coalitions started to shift. The author explains the involvement of Angola, Zimbabwe and the Sudan, and concludes with an outline of the long-term consequences of the two successive wars. Notes, ref.
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