Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database

Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Introduction of Western Education in Northern Somaliland
Author:Kakwenzire, Patrick K.
Year:1980
Periodical:Transafrican Journal of History
Volume:9
Issue:2
Pages:153-164
Language:English
Geographic terms:Somaliland
Great Britain
Subjects:colonialism
educational history
History and Exploration
Education and Oral Traditions
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/24328555
Abstract:In 1898 the Foreign Office assumed responsibility for the administration of the British Somaliland Protectorate. In spite of the contradictory literature about the Somali, it was generally held that once European values had been inculcated through Western education the Somali would, in due course, become amenable to British colonial rule. The first setback in Britain's optimism in the Somali receptiveness of European values was the failure of the French Capuchin Fathers' Mission at Berbera to make any headway, particularly in its educational aims. Steps to encourage missionary work or to initiate any educational programme of its own could not be taken by Britain because of the anticolonial Dervish movement led by the 'Mad Mullah'. It was not until after 1920 that Britain reconsidered planting new values and attitudes among the Somali through Western education. Financial, economic and political circumstances obstructed the elaboration of this idea but the greatest obstacle was the opposition by the Somali themselves to any form of Western education. In 1940 northern Somaliland still had no Western education. Notes.
Views

Cover