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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Civil society and the struggle for democracy in Zimbabwe
Author:Sithole, MasipulaISNI
Year:1998
Periodical:Quest: An International African Journal of Philosophy
Volume:12
Issue:1
Period:June
Pages:27-38
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
Subjects:political systems
resistance
opposition parties
politics
democracy
civil society
history
social problems
economic conditions
Nongovernmental organizations
authoritarianism
political opposition
Abstract:In Zimbabwe, in the absence of strong political opposition parties, opposition to authoritarianism has been spearheaded largely by civil society, witness, amongst others, the campaign initiated by the Catholic Commission for Justice and Peace (CCJP) against the intended establishment of the one-party State after the elections of April 1990; the anti-police brutality demonstration of November 1995 organized by ZimRights, the Zimbabwe Human Rights Association; the September 1996 civil service strike called by the Public Service Association; demonstrations by members of the Liberation War Veterans Association in 1997; the nationwide strike on 9 December 1997 to protest against heavy taxation and high costs of living called by the Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions (ZCTU); and the persistent calls, particularly since 1994, for constitutional reforms and the formation of the National Constitutional Assembly in January 1998 under the auspices of the Zimbabwe Council of Churches. There has been a progressive decline in ZANU(PF) elite cohesion and it appears that the party now has the option of either transforming itself into a democratic party, or remaining the undemocratic monster it has been since independence, continuing to expel its internal critics until it expels itself from power. Notes, ref.
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