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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Return of the Noble Savage: The Changing Image of Africans in Cape Colony Art, 1800-1850
Author:Bank, Andrew
Year:1998
Periodical:South African Historical Journal
Issue:39
Period:November
Pages:17-43
Language:English
Geographic terms:South Africa
The Cape
Great Britain
Subjects:images
Xhosa
colonization
painting
History and Exploration
colonialism
Ethnic and Race Relations
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Architecture and the Arts
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02582479808671327
Abstract:This article sketches the changing image of Africans in the colonial art of the Cape in the first part of the 19th century. It starts in the 18th century, when the idea of the noble savage reached its apogee in European thought. The visual images of the abolitionist-influenced artist Samuel Daniell (1775-1811) provide the most complete expression of the idea of the noble savage. As the British came into military conflict with the Xhosa in the early decades of the 19th century and this conflict intensified in the period 1830-1845, settler artists could no longer afford to view the Xhosa in such a noble and detached light. Colonial artists like Charles Davidson Bell (1813-1882) recast the Xhosa as cruel and ignoble savages. But in the wake of British imperial conquest over the Xhosa in the late 1840s and 1850s colonial artists like Frederick Timpson I'Ons (1802-1875) revived the conventions of noble savagery, once again casting the Xhosa in a sentimental noble light. Notes, ref.
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