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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Beginnings of Girls' Education in the Native Administration Schools in Northern Nigeria, 1930-1945
Author:Tibenderana, Peter K.
Year:1985
Periodical:The Journal of African History
Volume:26
Issue:1
Pages:93-109
Language:English
Geographic terms:Northern Nigeria
Nigeria
Subjects:schooling
girls
History and Exploration
Education and Oral Traditions
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
colonialism
Historical/Biographical
Education and Training
Cultural Roles
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/181840
Abstract:In 1929 E.R.J. Hussey, the first Director of Education for the whole of Nigeria, proposed the establishment of two girls' centres at Kano and Katsina. It was hoped that the study of personal hygiene, child-care, welfare work, and such dome stic science subjects as might be found to be applicable to local conditions together withreading, writing and elementary arithmetic, instructed in Hausa, would make girls 'good' wives for the educated sons of chiefs. Only daughters of the emirs and other title holders and some wealthy traders were to be admitted. If the scheme was successful in Kano and Katsina it would gradually be extended to other areas. This article describes the several stages of this special education for girls: Introduction - The inception of girls' education - The impact of co-education on the development of girls' education - Attempts to train Muslim women teachers - Conclusion. Notes, sum.
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