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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Income Tax, Indirect Rule and the Depression: The Gold Coast Riots of 1931
Author:Shaloff, Stanley
Year:1974
Periodical:Cahiers d'études africaines
Volume:14
Issue:54
Pages:359-375
Language:English
Geographic term:Ghana
Subjects:rebellions
income tax
history
1931
colonialism
History and Exploration
Economics and Trade
External link:https://doi.org/10.3406/cea.1974.2649
Abstract:Although the Cold Coast in the early 1930's might not have experienced the mature expression of African nationalism, nevertheless particular issues engendered responses evocative of later political upheavals. One of the most violent of these manifestations was in reaction to Governor Ransford Slater's efforts - in the context of the implementation of indirect rule - to introduce an income tax. Large numbers of people, among the educated coastal elite and the rural commoners and even some of the host of lesser chiefs and functionaries in the countryside saw the projected native treasury system and the previously established Provincial Councils of Chiefs as clear violations of tradition. The depression of 1929 added another dimension to the difficulties. The Governor, despite the opposition to his ideas, showed no indulgence. The result were troubles in Sekondi and Cape Coast, and at last the Governor had to give in. Notes.
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