Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database

Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Land Reform, Growth and Equity: Emerging Evidence From Zimbabwe's Resettlement Programme
Author:Kinsey, Bill H.ISNI
Year:1999
Periodical:Journal of Southern African Studies
Volume:25
Issue:2
Period:June
Pages:173-196
Language:English
Geographic term:Zimbabwe
Subjects:resettlement
land reform
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
Development and Technology
Law, Human Rights and Violence
Politics and Government
Ethnic and Race Relations
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/2637599
Abstract:Zimbabwe's resettlement programme is nearly 20 years old. The first families were resettled in 1980, just a few months after independence, and the programme has to date resettled over 70,000 families, well short of the target of 162,000 set in the early 1980s. The author argues that, notwithstanding the lag, negative assessments of Zimbabwe's land reform are premature. He focuses not so much on the programme as a whole but rather on the households participating in it. He takes the original - largely political - objectives of the programme, which placed great emphasis on welfare and poverty alleviation, and assesses the extent to which these have been met, on the basis of the findings of a 15-year, 400-household panel study (whose sampling frame included all resettlement schemes established in the first two years (1980-1982) in Zimbabwe's three agriculturally most important agro-climatic zones) and comparison with a contrasting group of 150 households in communal areas. The empirical core of the paper investigates the benefits from resettlement using a set of variables defining income, consumption and welfare at the household level. The conclusion is that Zimbabwe's resettlement programme has resulted in both higher incomes and more equally distributed incomes. Resettled households crop twice the amount of land and earn more than three times the unit revenues of communal area households. Notes, ref., sum.
Views

Cover