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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Medicines and Fetishes in Igala
Author:Boston, John S.
Year:1971
Periodical:Africa: Journal of the International African Institute
Volume:41
Issue:3
Period:July
Pages:200-207
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:healers
ritual objects
Igala
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Links:https://www.jstor.org/stable/1158838
http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&res_dat=xri:pao:&rft_dat=xri:pao:article:4011-1971-041-00-000016
Abstract:The Igala of Nigeria use medicines and fetishes. Medicines consist of vegetable substances, oli ogwu, and a magical substance called ayibo. The latter refers to a wide variety of substances which are difficult to obtain, such as the tail of a scorpion or soap used in washing a corpse. Whereas medicines have to be renewed if their power is to be maintained, fetishes or ode are a combination of magical and vegetable ingredients made up in a permanent form as a fetish bundle. The commonest use of medicines is to cure illness or to neutralize harmful medicines. Fetishes are believed to prevent witchcraft and sorcery, which becomes explicit in the invocations which are made during preparation. Ancestors can be invoked as past servants of the same fetish. Ref., notes, French summary.
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