Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database

Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Christian Captives at 'Hard Labor' in Algiers, Sixteenth-Eighteenth Centuries
Author:Friedman, Ellen G.ISNI
Year:1980
Periodical:International Journal of African Historical Studies
Volume:13
Issue:4
Pages:616-632
Language:English
Geographic term:Algeria
Subjects:slaves
history
1500-1599
1600-1699
1700-1799
Religion and Witchcraft
History and Exploration
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/218198
Abstract:It was believed that those who fell into the hands of the so-called Barbary pirates could expect a life of hard labor and treatment far more cruel than that meted out to prisoners and captives in Christian societies. Furthermore, for women and young children there would be sexual abase, and for all captives constant pressure to apostatize and become Muslims. This view was strongly influenced by the writings of religious redemtionists in Spain, France and Italy. This was reinforced by the literature of particularly the Spanish Golden Age. It is argued here that while cruelty toward captives undoubtedly did occur in general the treatment of Christian slaves in Algiers was at least consistent with the standards of the age -that it compared favorably with the treatment of prisoners and slaves in Christian society and that a conscious effort was made by the Algerians to keep their slaves alive and healthy. The reason for this concern was primarily economic; the labor services of captives, as well as the ransoms paid for them, were critical to the Algerian economy. Notes.
Views

Cover