Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home Africana Periodical Literature Go to database home

bibliographic database

Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Multi Ritual Murder in Natal: From Chiefs to Commoners (1900-1930)
Author:Turrell, Rob
Year:2001
Periodical:South African Historical Journal
Issue:44
Pages:21-39
Language:English
Geographic terms:South Africa
Natal
Subjects:homicide
witchcraft
History and Exploration
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Law, Human Rights and Violence
Link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02582470108671387
Abstract:In Natal, South Africa, 'muti', the ritual killing of a human, was required for the acquisition of extraordinary power. And extraordinary power was required to win competitive advantages in chiefly rivalries over people and land. Therefore 'muti' murders were closely associated with chiefly politics. Still these murders were exceptional in precolonial polities and were only committed in the face of an extremely serious challenge to chiefly power. Ritual killing became more common as the evil of colonial encroachment placed a range of social and economic pressures on Zulu chiefdoms. Between the 1900s and 1930s Natal chiefs lost their monopoly of ritual murder. By the 1920s the use of human flesh in chiefly politics had been overtaken by its use in strengthening ambitious commoners. 'Muti' murder had become a widespread practice outside the realm of chiefly politics. Notes, ref.
Views

Cover