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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Designing Agricultural Technology for African Women Farmers: Lessons from 25 Years of Experience
Author:Doss, Cheryl R.ISNI
Year:2001
Periodical:World Development
Volume:29
Issue:12
Period:December
Pages:2075-2092
Language:English
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:gender relations
women farmers
agricultural technology
Women's Issues
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
Development and Technology
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
History and Exploration
agriculture
Labor and Employment
Historical/Biographical
Sex Roles
External link:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0305-750X(01)00088-2
Abstract:African women farmers are less likely than men to adopt improved crop varieties and management systems. Based on literature of the past 25 years, this paper addresses two issues: How does gender affect technology adoption among African farmers? How does the introduction of new technologies affect women's well-being? The paper examines how gendered patterns of labour allocation, access to land, and use of other inputs affect technology adoption and the distribution of benefits. Furthermore, it asks whether men and women have different preferences for outputs, with special reference to maize, and it examines how household decisionmaking processes affect technology adoption decisions and the allocation of costs and benefits among household members. Three general conclusions can be drawn: African households are complex and heterogeneous; gender roles within African households and communities cannot be simply summarized; and gender roles and responsiblities are dynamic, they respond to changing economic circumstances. The paper demonstrates the complexity and importance of efforts to design interventions for African women. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.
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