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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:HIV/AIDS, Poverty, and Elderly Women in Urban Zimbabwe
Author:Bindura-Mutangadura, GladysISNI
Year:2000
Periodical:SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review (ISSN 1024-9451)
Volume:4-5
Issue:2-1
Pages:93-105
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
Subjects:elderly women
urban population
AIDS
Cultural Roles
Health, Nutrition, and Medicine
Sex Roles
Status of Women
Demographics
Medicine, Nutrition, Public Health
AIDS (Disease)
Aged
poverty
urban women
mortality
Economic and social development
Link:https://www.ajol.info/index.php/safere/article/view/23932
Abstract:Zimbabwe is among the southern African countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. This paper analyses the welfare impacts of HIV/AIDs-related morbidity and mortality on elderly women in a low-income suburb of Zimbabwe's capital, Harare. Research indicates that elderly African women tend to live in vertically extended families, particularly with their married sons. As AIDS continues to afflict young adults, it intensifies the vulnerability of the elderly, who are left without social and economic support. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with 20 elderly women indicated that they have been negatively affected by the epidemic in socioeconomic and psychological ways: increased work burdens, loss of income, increased health expenditures, increased sales of assets, and the psychological problems of caring for a sick adult child. The women adopted a variety of mechanisms for coping with the impacts of HIV/AIDS, including reduced consumption and taking on multiple jobs. The paper suggests policy response options that could strengthen the capacity of elderly women to cope with the impacts of the mortality and morbidity of economically active groups. Bibliogr., sum. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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