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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:White Skin, Many Masks: Colonial Schooling, Race, and National Consciousness Among White Settler Children in Mozambique, 1934-1974
Author:Errante, Antoinette
Year:2003
Periodical:International Journal of African Historical Studies
Volume:36
Issue:1
Pages:7-33
Language:English
Geographic term:Mozambique
Subjects:children
nationalism
race relations
colonists
Portuguese
schooling
schools
colonialism
History and Exploration
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Ethnic and Race Relations
Education and Oral Traditions
Link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/3559317
Abstract:The author examines the degree to which schools in colonial Mozambique shaped the racial and national consciousness of White settler children (1934-1975). She bases herself on archival material and oral histories. The story begins with Portugal's need for a colonial omnipotence myth as a way of repairing its own injured national identity. Pathologies originating from this metropolitan context created the social and structural hierarchies that fostered an extremist pattern of migration to Mozambique. This migration to Mozambique resulted in the artificial homogenization of Whites in relation to Blacks even as it heightened class tensions and conflicts within the White settler community. These tensions only exacerbated the weak allegiance to Portugal some settlers already brought with them to the colony. While weak allegiances helped sever some settlers' and their children's identification with Portugal, Mozambique's own 'charisma of place' enabled them to formulate alternative conceptions of race and nation. Throughout, the author illustrates how the structure and content of colonial schooling helped shape conceptions of race and nation implicit in the myth of colonial omnipotence as well as in formulating alternative conceptions. Notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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