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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Slipping through Their Fingers: Women's Migration and Tswana Patriarchy
Author:Cockerton, Camilla M.
Year:2002
Periodical:Botswana Notes and Records (ISSN 0525-5090)
Volume:34
Pages:37-53
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Botswana
Southern Africa
Subjects:gender relations
Tswana
women migrants
labour migration
Women's Issues
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Urbanization and Migration
History and Exploration
colonialism
Cultural Roles
urbanization
Sex Roles
Historical/Biographical
History, Archaeology
history
women
migration
patriarchy
Tswana (African people)
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/40980321
Abstract:This article explores the nature of the patriarchal response within Tswana society (Bechuanaland, present-day Botswana) to the growing emigration of Tswana women, from the late 19th century to the 1920s. While female migrants exercised some choice over whether they would fall into the traditional role of women, or evade male mechanisms of control through migration, their autonomy was strictly circumscribed. Thus migration posed a significant threat to those who exercised those controls. Various groups of indigenous men, including royal leaders, elders, headmen, husbands, and fathers, as well as colonial officials and even missionaries, opposed women's migration. But individual responses did vary. Local patriarchs became concerned about the issue of women's migration much earlier than their colonial counterparts, but did not turn to the colonial government for help until the 1920s. Notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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