Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database
Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Witchcraft, Anti-Witchcraft and Trans-Regional Ritual Innovation in Early Colonial Ghana: Sakrabundi and Aberewa, 1889-1910
Author:Parker, John
Year:2004
Periodical:The Journal of African History
Volume:45
Issue:3
Pages:393-420
Language:English
Geographic term:Ghana
Subjects:Akan
witchcraft
witch-hunting
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Religion and Witchcraft
colonialism
History and Exploration
Link:http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4F6EB8CAB0ED564BA429
Abstract:This article examines the origins and dynamics of Aberewa, an anti-witchcraft movement that rose to prominence in the Akan forest region of Asante and the Gold Coast (Ghana) in 1906-1910. It suggests that while the political, social and economic changes of the early colonial period acted as a catalyst for its widespread expansion, Aberewa emerged from an earlier cult called Sakrabundi that was already moving from the savanna into the northern reaches of the Asante empire by the 1880s. The ritual trajectory and popular appeal of Sakrabundi and Aberewa are explored within the context of the ambivalent relationship between the Akan peoples and their northern savanna neighbours. An argument is made for the need to consider witchcraft and anti-witchcraft in Africa as historical processes rather than as a set of structural beliefs and practices. Notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
Views

Cover