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Title:Cultural and Resource Determinants of Severe Maternal Morbidity: Lessons from Some 'Near Miss' Experiences
Author:Bantebya-Kyomuhendo, Grace
Year:2004
Periodical:African Sociological Review (ISSN 1027-4332)
Volume:8
Issue:1
Pages:67-82
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Uganda
East Africa
Africa
Subjects:morbidity
maternal and child health care
pregnancy
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Health and Nutrition
Miscellaneous (i.e. Demography, Refugees, Sports)
Women's Issues
Cultural Roles
Demographics
Health, Nutrition, and Medicine
sociology
Maternal--Mortality
diseases
women's health
culture
gender relations
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/24487416
Abstract:In Uganda, severe maternal morbidity remains a problem to reckon with. This paper reports part of a wider study conducted in two rural districts, Hoima and Kiboga, and one urban district, Kampala, between 1999 and 2000. It documents the circumstances that lead women to death-threatening medical crisis situations. Case studies of six women are presented, who survived complications due to ectopic pregnancy; severe post-abortion sepsis; incomplete abortion; eclampsia; post-partum haemorrhage; and post-partum haemorrhage after a normal delivery, respectively. It appears that severe maternal illness is not necessarily a result of direct (biomedical) causes per se, but may stem from other factors rooted in culture and gender relationships. These factors notwithstanding, women are hampered by deficiencies in the formal health care system including inexperienced health workers, poor referral systems, the lack of a well-functioning transport system, limited space in the wards or operating theatre, and inability to access the busy health staff. These constraints often lead to critical delays, which aggravate women's morbidity experiences. Appropriate interventions, including delivery of culturally accepted maternal health information and addressing the lack of quality maternal health services, are required. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract, edited]
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