Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database
Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical issue Periodical issue Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Textual ownership in francophone African writing
Editors:Hargreaves, Alec G.ISNI
Hitchcott, NickiISNI
Thomas, DominicISNI
Year:2006
Periodical:Research in African Literatures (ISSN 0034-5210)
Volume:37
Issue:1
Pages:173
Language:English
Geographic terms:Africa
Maghreb
Algeria
Cameroon
Congo (Republic of)
Guinea
Mali
Senegal
Subjects:literature
French language
copyright
conference papers (form)
2004
About persons:Calixthe Beyala (1961-)ISNI
Camara Laye (1928-1980)ISNI
Elissa Rhaïs (1876-1940)
Sony Labou Tansi (1947-1995)ISNI
Paul Smaïl (1970-)ISNI
Sembène Ousmane (1923-2007)ISNI
Amadou Hampaté Bâ (1900-1991)ISNI
Adèle KingISNI
External link:http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/research_in_african_literatures/toc/ral37.1.html
Abstract:The papers in this special issue were first delivered at an international conference on 'Textual ownership in francophone African writing', hosted by the Winthrop-King Institute for Contemporary French and Francophone Studies at Florida State University on 22-23 October 2004. All literary texts are constructed in part by borrowing from or reappropriating pre-existing discourses. Where does reproduction end and invention begin? What burden of acknowledgment is due? Where is the dividing line between borrowing and stealing? These issues are addressed in this issue. Mireille Rosello discusses the scandal around the Algerian author Elissa Rhaïs; Roger Little examines textual exploitation by a selection of African, Caribbean, and European writers in French; Lydie Moudileno focuses on the conceptualization of the work of the Congolese novelist Sony Labou Tansi; Alec G. Hargreaves discusses co-authorship and dispossession among women writers of Maghrebi origin in France; Azouz Begag focuses on the French writer Paul Smaïl's 'Vivre me tue'; Dominic Thomas examines intertextuality, plagiarism and recycling in Ousmane Sembene's (Senegal) 'Le docker noir'; Jean-Marc Moura looks at the Malian scholar Ahmadou Hampaté Bâ's 'L'étrange destin de Wangrin'; Nicki Hitchcott discusses plagiarism and authenticity on the basis of the case of Calixthe Beyala's work (Cameroon); F. Abiola Irele discusses Adele King's revisionist reading of Camara Laye (Guinea). The introduction is by Alec G. Hargreaves, Nicki Hitchcott and Dominic Thomas. [ASC Leiden abstract]
Views

Cover