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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Engendering Civil Society: Oil, Women Groups and Resource Conflicts in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria
Author:Ikelegbe, Augustine
Year:2005
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume:43
Issue:2
Period:June
Pages:241-270
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:civil society
women's organizations
protest
Economics and Trade
Education and Oral Traditions
Drought and Desertification
Anthropology and Archaeology
Bibliography/Research
Military, Defense and Arms
organizations
Development and Technology
economics
Law, Legal Issues, and Human Rights
Link:http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4AEC800F0BB0AB7CB974
Abstract:Civil society has been an active mobilizational and agitational force in the resource conflicts of the Niger Delta region in Nigeria. The paper examines the gender segment of civil society and its character, forms and roles in these conflicts. The central argument is that marginality can be a basis of gendered movements and their engagement in struggles for justice, accommodation and fair access to benefits. Utilizing secondary data and primary data elicited from oral interviews, the study identifies and categorizes women's groupings and identifies their roles and engagements in the oil economy. It finds that community women organizations, with the support of numerous grassroots women's organizations, are the most active and frequently engaged in the local oil economies, where they have constructed and appropriated traditional women's protests as an instrument of engagement. The paper notes the implications of women's protest engagements and particularly their exasperation with previous engagements, the depth of their commitments, and the extension of the struggle beyond the threshold of normal social behaviour. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract]
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